dr Gregory Szarycz

dr Gregory Szarycz
Zakład Zakład Glottodydaktyki
email
Konsultacje http://www.ifa.uni.wroc.pl/dla-studenta/office-hours/?lang=pl
Biogram

I come from London, England. I was initially trained as a social anthropologist. I later earned a Master's degree in sociology and education from the University of Cambridge, a PhD in human geography from the University of Otago in New Zealand and subsequently earned a place for post-doctoral training in interdisciplinary studies at the University of Oxford. My work takes me across a number of different fields that intersect with an interest and research expertise in place, identity, older people, health, heritage and tourism, anthrozoology and qualitative and interpretive research methods (phenomenology, symbolic interactionism, grounded theory, narrative).

My main areas of fieldwork have been the North American United States and Canada, Oceania (New Zealand), Asia (Hong Kong and mainland China) and Europe (UK and Poland), where I have, in good sociological tradition, focussed on human group life in the making; accordingly it has been fairly easy to move back and forth between field research, ethno-historical materials, and more sustained theoretical matters.

In a purely quantitative sense, my publications to date include 1 edited book, 10 chapters, 19 peer reviewed articles [3 in preparation or under review] and 6 scholarly reviews. I have delivered 30 peer reviewed papers at international conferences spanning 5 continents. My commitment to international and interdisciplinary research is evidenced by the global and broad thematic scope of the outlets in which I have published, i.e. such varied peer-reviewed journals as Anthropological Forum, Journal of Intercultural Studies, International Journal of Language, Society and Culture, Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People and Animals, Gerontology, Current Issues in Tourism and Qualitative Sociology Review. I am editor of Research Realities in the Social Sciences: Negotiating Fieldwork Dilemmas (Cambria Press 2010), which is addressed to a wide range of disciplines that currently engage in fieldwork and moves beyond the basic ethical and methodological principles governing research, and informs the reader of the complexity— the pitfalls—of contemporary fieldwork. This book (used on several modules that I have taught in the past) was researched, edited and written as an advanced introspective and retrospective methods text for aspiring researchers.

I have positions on the editorial boards of several social science journals and have acted as reviewer for Folia Turistica, Qualitative Sociology Review, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Journal of Housing for the Elderly, Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Student Anthropologist, Anthrozoos and Journal of Education, Culture, and Society.

Here at IFA, I specialise in Applied Language Skills (Speaking, Vocabulary), Critical Thinking Skills, English for Special Purposes, Translation, and the History of Vulgarity and Obscenity.